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Photos and text depicting the installation of a Generator Sub-Panel and a Reliance PB 30 L14-30 Flanged Inlet.  Click for The Home Page

Generator Sub-Panel With a 120/240 Volt 30 Amp, L14-30 Reliance PB-30 Flanged Inlet

Dear Mr. Electrician: I want to have a portable generator connection for circuits in my house such as the furnace, the sump pump, and the refrigerator.  How can I install this?

Answer: One simple installation is a stand-alone generator sub-panel for some previously selected circuits to be powered when the generator is on.  Below are photos of a generator sub-panel installation with a PB-30 generator inlet.  Some of the applicable articles from the National Electrical Code concerning the installation of generator sub-panels are: 210, 230, 250, 300, 310, 314, 334 and 702.  There is a short video clip at the bottom depicting the installation of a Reliance PB 30 generator inlet.
 
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Photo of a Cutler Hammer Main Electrical Panel, click to go to the next photo
The Cutler Hammer main electrical panel on the right is nicely hidden in this finished basement, however it is now difficult to add or remove circuits due to a lack of accessibility. 

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Click to see this Cutler Hammer main electrical panel without a cover
This is the inside of the main electrical panel before any changes were made for the new generator sub-panel installation with a Reliance PB-30 generator inlet . 

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The inside of a Cutler Hammer main electrical panel. Click for next photo
Two large junction boxes were installed close to the main electrical panel and in the ceiling so that the circuit wires could be spliced and extended to the new generator sub-panel.

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Two junction boxes were installed to extend the circuit wires from the main panel to the new Square D generator sub-panel. Click for next photo
This is the view inside of the wall looking at the right side of the main electrical panel.  The view is from inside of a basement utility closet where the new generator sub-panel will be located. 

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A side view of the Cutler Hammer main electrical panel installed in the basement wall.  Click for next photo
Another angle of the large junction boxes that were installed to extend the existing circuit wires over to the new generator sub-panel. The joists are prefabricated I-Joists with pre-punched holes every 12" for wires and pipes.  

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Another view of the junction boxes that were used to extend the existing circuit wires into the new generator sub-panel. click for next photo
Another view of the large junction boxes located in the accessible ceiling.

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Additional view of the junction boxes that were used to extend the existing circuit wires into the new generator sub-panel.  Click for next photo
The upper arrow points to the cable feed that is coming from the generator inlet mounted on the outside of the house. 

The other arrow points to the interlock device attached to the generator circuit breaker.  The interlock prevents the two main circuit breakers from being on at the same time.  

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A Square D generator sub-panel wired to an outside flanged inlet.  Click for next photo
This Square D generator sub-panel is different in several ways from a regular sub-panel.  It comes with two main breakers, one for street power and one for generator power.  They are interlocked together to prevent both from being on at the same time.  In addition each main breaker has a clamp on it holding it to the busbar as is required by article 408.36(D) in the National Electrical Code . 

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Another view of the Square D generator sub-panel. Click for next photo
   
 
   
Because the junction boxes are metal, they are required to be grounded by using a green ground screw with one of the grounding conductors under it.  

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The completed junction boxes. Metal boxes are required to be grounded. Click for next photo
Another view of the large junction boxes. 

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Closer view of the metal junction boxes used to extend the circuit wires to the new generator sub-panel. Click for next photo
Here is the Square D generator sub-panel completed and labeled. 

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Closed shot of the completed Square D generator sub-panel installation. Click for next photo
The upper arrow points to the 10/3 Romex cable that is coming from the generator inlet mounted outside which will supply power to the generator sub-panel from the generator when needed. 

The lower arrow points to the 10/3 Romex cable that is coming from the main panel to feed the
Square D generator sub-panel on street power. 

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Photo depicts the feed wire from the main panel and the feed wire from the generator.  Click for next photo
The two 30 amp main circuit breakers with the interlock device between them. Note the twin circuit breakers for the branch circuits. 

Notice that the circuit breakers for the furnace and basement lights are connected with a handle tie.  This is required by article 210.4(B) of the National Electrical Code because these circuits are a multiwire branch circuit.  NEXT

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Very close shot of the Square D generator sub-panel with the circuits labeled. Click for next photo.
   
The arrow indicates the change from two single pole circuit breakers to one, two pole, 30 amp circuit breaker to feed the new generator sub-panel.  

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Arrow indicates the generator sub-panel feed circuit breaker in the cutler Hammer main electrical panel. Click for next photo
The L14-30 flanged inlet mounted on the exterior of the house. 

A generator cord is used to connect the generator flanged inlet to a portable generator in order to supply power to the generator sub-panel.

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The flanged generator inlet which connects the generator to the generator sub-panel using a generator cord. Click for next photo
With the cover down, rain is kept out.

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Close shot of a 30 amp L14-30 flanged inlet for connecting a generator to your home.  Click for next photo
This Generator inlet is actually a 30 amp 4 prong twist lock plug    

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The flanged inlet is actually a plug that connects to the female end of a generator cord.  Click for next photo
The generator inlet  is ready for the next power outage when the generator cord will be plugged into it.

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Side view of the generator inlet.  Click for a view of a Siemens generator ready electrical panel
Here is an example of a Siemens Generator Ready Load Center.  It has provisions for a manual or automatic transfer switch to be mounted directly on the panel.  

The red arrow points to the
10/3 Romex cable that only supply's power to the lower section of the panel from the generator inlet that is mounted outside, when the interlock is switched to generator power.

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A Siemens generator ready main electrical panel for a house.  Click for next photo
The red arrow indicates the interlock connection between the main breaker for the lower section and the breaker for the generator inlet .  The generator breaker on the right side of the interlock is fed from the 30 amp generator inlet outside using 10/3 Romex cable  

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A close shot of a Siemens generator ready electrical main panel for a house.  Click for next photo

A 75' custom cord connected to a different style of generator inlet box.

A typical 30 amp generator cord is made from 10 Gauge, 4 Conductor (10/4) 600V SOOW

 

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A homemade 30 amp, L14-30 generator cord.  Click for one more photo

A 30 amp L14-30 flanged inlet box made by Eaton with the inlet underneath to keep it dry.

 

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Generator Hook-Up Kit
A 30 amp L14-30 generator inlet with the plug underneath to protect from the weather.
 
 
 
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Created January 19, 2013          Updated December 14, 2015

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